Tuesday’s Headlines Are Down in the Flood

Water rushing into the Hoboken PATH station through an elevator shaft after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Photo credit: Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
Water rushing into the Hoboken PATH station through an elevator shaft after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Photo credit: Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
  • Fare-free transit is more equitable and boosts ridership, but may not have much impact on climate change. That’s because the ridership gains from going fare-free mostly come from people who would have walked, biked or stayed home, rather than driven. (City Lab)
  • A lack of transit investment means that average people must pay more for transportation. (Government Technology)
  • Safer streets not only save lives, but improve the quality of life. (World Economic Forum)
  • Walking can be faster than driving—if you count the amount of time you have to spend working to pay for the car and the gas. (Arch Daily)
  • Austin’s Project Connect provides lessons for other communities that are about to see a major influx of infrastructure funding. (Eno Center for Transportation)
  • Vancouver, Washington, light-rail riders are excited about the new I-5 bridge to Portland (KPTV), but Bike Portland is critical of the route, which avoids downtown.
  • Memphis public transportation advocates say they aren’t seeing results from an influx of funding that was meant to beef up service in low-income neighborhoods. (Action News 5)
  • Denver advocates are pushing for an initiative creating an annual property fee to fund sidewalk construction. (Westword)
  • San Diego’s last surviving pandemic-era “slow street” is under threat. (Union-Tribune)
  • Indianapolis cyclists are fighting back against drivers who block bike lanes. (WRTV)
  • This Twitter account reminds users of all the bike projects that Nashville isn’t building. (Scene)
  • Elon Musk thinks subway tunnels don’t flood. Tell that to people in New York City, or Berlin, or Paris, or Mumbai, or Toronto … (Gizmodo)

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Study: Free Transit Helps Local Businesses

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A new study finds that commuters with access to free public transportation don't drive any less — but they do take more leisure and shopping trips than those who have to pay their own fare, which could help provide local economies with the cash they need to provide a broader range of social services over time.