Friday’s Headlines Have a Deal … Psyche!

  • President Biden thought he had worked out a framework for a nearly $2 trillion climate change and safety net bill, but House progressives are so unhappy with it that they’re withholding support for the related hard infrastructure bill. (New York Times)
  • Kids are three times more likely to be killed by drivers on Halloween than any other day. Better street design and lower speed limits, among other reforms, would help. (City Lab)
  • Former Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx is stepping down as Lyft’s chief policy officer. (Politico)
  • San Diego is considering making transit fare-free by 2030, as well as a vehicle miles driven tax to raise revenue. (Union-Tribune)
  • San Francisco supervisors rejected a housing development that would’ve been located on a parking lot next to a transit station. (SFGate)
  • A new report recommends dividing NJ Transit into two agencies because it’s biased toward North Jersey commuters. (Philly Voice)
  • The Colorado DOT and Regional Transportation District have resolved a dispute over $34 million in federal transit funding. (Colorado Public Radio)
  • The Loop Trolley in St. Louis is still dead after a regional council rejected a federal grant to restart it. (St. Louis Public Radio)
  • Ridership on Charlotte’s new streetcar isn’t meeting expectations because so many people are still working from home (WFAE). In other news, the city is working on a marketing plan to overcome suburban opposition to regional transit (WBTV)
  • The private South Florida railroad Brightline introduced a shuttle or ride-hailing service that will pick you up and take you to the station. (Mass Transit)
  • Finally, don’t forget to cast your vote in Streetsblog‘s “America’s Most Toxic Car Ad” contest.

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