Thursday’s Headlines From Your Lizard Overlords

Jordan Peterson (pictured) went viral this week with his conspiracy theory that the installation of "traffic filters" in Oxford England are part of “well-documented” global plot to imprison and rob its citizens. Credit: Gage Skidmore
Jordan Peterson (pictured) went viral this week with his conspiracy theory that the installation of "traffic filters" in Oxford England are part of “well-documented” global plot to imprison and rob its citizens. Credit: Gage Skidmore
  • Conspiracy theories about bike lanes and congestion pricing are going mainstream. (The Guardian)
  • A lot of reporters writing about congestion pricing are doing it wrong. (City Observatory)
  • Contrary to fears that congestion pricing would impact lower-income people the most, the top 40 percent pay 60 percent of the fees in London, according to an MIT study. But governments still need to fund other modes to make it equitable. (State Smart Transportation Initiative)
  • E-bikes could provide the push needed to finally get serious about non-car transportation infrastructure. (Planetizen)
  • Federal funding represents an opportunity for transit agencies in 2023, but recruiting workers and riders, as well as dealing with inflation and supply-chain issues, remain challenges. (Mass Transit)
  • Small cities are experiencing unprecedented population growth, and should be ramping up bus service to deal with it. (Metro Magazine)
  • Transit agencies in Chicago and Philadelphia are making it easier for minority-owned businesses to obtain contracts. (Route Fifty)
  • Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) retired rather than give up his gavel as chair of the House Transportation Committee, but he remains addicted to infrastructure. (Roll Call)
  • Facing a $22 billion deficit, California Gov. Gavin Newsom is asking the feds for more funding to help struggling transit agencies. (San Francisco Standard)
  • D.C. Metro officials are hoping that improving service while optimizing fares to pay for it will avoid a fiscal calamity. (Greater Greater Washington)
  • Dangerous drivers and lack of protected bike lanes are making it hard for Seattle residents to commute by bike. (MyNorthwest)
  • Transit advocates are right to be skeptical about the Charlotte Area Transit System’s new numbers for Silver Line ridership. (Observer)
  • Virginia should get onboard with electrified rail. (Mercury)
  • After five years, a complete streets makeover of congested Howell Mill Road has yet to begin. (Urbanize Atlanta)
  • Something about being ensconced in several thousand pounds of metal seems to turn everyone into a middle-school bully. (Mother Jones)

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Image: Beyond DC, CC

Op-Ed: Congestion Pricing Can Be Equitable, If Done Right

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Editor’s note: A version of this article originally appeared on Greater Greater Washington and is republished with permission.  Congestion pricing is a strategy that charges drivers more for using road space during peak demand times. It’s an idea with many potential benefits, from reducing traffic to improving the environment. But congestion pricing also draws criticism around […]

Congestion Pricing: Does New York Have the Will?

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Brad Aaron reports: Political will, holistic planning, centralized management. That’s what Malcolm Murray-Clark says it takes to implement an effective congestion pricing plan. He should know. The Director of Congestion Charging at Transport for London (TfL) oversees a program that is as ambitious as it is successful — a program that went from idea to […]

Queens Chamber Continues Campaign Against Congestion Pricing

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Foes of congestion pricing marshalled by the Queens Chamber of Commerce held a press conference yesterday at which several politicians from the borough took a stand against the mayor’s plan. According to a press release provided by the chamber, City Council Finance Chair David Weprin called the proposal unnecessary: "I don’t think City Hall understands […]