Tuesday’s Headlines Are Much Too Fast

Photo: Gersh Kuntzman
Photo: Gersh Kuntzman
  • Many electric vehicles are faster than a gas-powered Ferrari, accelerating from zero to 60 in two seconds. This amount of horsepower poses a deadly danger to cyclists and pedestrians, but regulators are unprepared to act. (City Lab)
  • Small cities often lack the staff and expertise to apply for federal infrastructure grants, and the National League of Cities is hoping to change that. (Route Fifty)
  • The National Highway Safety Administration released a video showing drivers how to share the road with cyclists. (Bicycling)
  • A $17 billion plan to remove massive freeway interchanges in Hartford is gaining traction. (CT Mirror)
  • Work on the Twin Cities’ Southwest light rail line continues, but no one knows who will pay to fill a budget gap. (Star Tribune)
  • With many people working from home post-pandemic, Facebook has abandoned plans to restore an abandoned railroad to bring employees to its Bay Area headquarters. (New York Times)
  • In New Mexico, a bill has been filed to make sidewalk upkeep the responsibility of local governments rather than property owners, who often don’t even know they’re required to fix them. (KRQE)
  • Denver needs to do a better job of clearing sidewalks and bike lanes after snowstorms. (Westword)
  • Denver’s popular e-bike rebate program is coming back in 2023 (Denver Post). A similar subsidy has been proposed in Atlanta (Inside EVs).
  • A high-ranking Metro Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority official abruptly left his job just five months after being hired. (Saporta Report)
  • KPBS interviewed author and urban planner Jeff Speck about how San Diego can become a more walkable city.
  • A college football player out drinking in New Orleans tried to do the right thing and take an Uber home. Instead, he got into a police cruiser by mistake. (Times-Picayune)

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