Monday’s Headlines to Start the Week

  • Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, Oregon Rep. Earl Blumenauer, former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Beth Osborne, head of Transportation for America, are the frontrunners to be Joe Biden’s transportation secretary. (Politico, USA Today)
  • Progressives made big gains in urban areas during last week’s elections, which should mean better transportation policies for cities (City Lab). And New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is all over that! (NY Times)
  • Volkswagen’s $2.9-billion fund from a lawsuit over cheating on emissions standards is paying for cleaner buses, but many of them are still polluting diesels instead of electric. (New York Times)
  • Yonah Freemark highlighted Joe Biden’s commitment to electric transit for all cities with more than 100,000 people.
  • Maybe now Infrastructure Week will finally happen! Here are 11 projects Curbed thinks the Biden administration should build in New York City.
  • Uber and Lyft drivers are split on the passage of Prop 22 in California. (NPR)
  • Minneapolis’s plans to redesign Hennepin Avenue are still too auto-centric. (Streets.mn)
  • With capacity on buses limited because of coronavirus, Boston is addressing delays with pop-up bus lanes. (Next City)
  • Mass Transit looks at a good bus expansion in Albany, N.Y.
  • A Nairobi highway expansion project is running into opposition because, for one thing, it’s a foolish, short-sighted way to speed up commutes and, secondly, it would destroy a beloved, centuries-old fig tree. (NY Times)
  • A Utah bus rapid transit line is finally getting moving. (Salt Lake Tribune)
  • The Charleston Post and Courier reiterates its support for BRT.
  • Climate and sustainability expert Darryl Young suggests on Twitter that Biden, a noted train aficionado, deserves an Amtrak One:

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