Tuesday’s Headlines from All Over

  • Post-pandemic, commuters will be making shorter trips around their neighborhood rather than rush-hour trips downtown, and cities should be redesigning their transportation systems around that shift. (Forbes)
  • States are facing billions of dollars in shortfalls for transit and other transportation projects, and the fiscal situation could take years to get back to normal. (Washington Post)
  • If Uber and Lyft convince California voters to overturn a new law classifying gig workers as employees, it would be a major blow to their labor rights. Making matters worse, changing the law back would be nearly impossible. (Salon)
  • A new 10-mile bike path in Miami could eventually become part of a greenway allowing people to bike all the way from Maine to Florida. Another planned cross-country bike route would connect Washington, D.C. with Washington State. (Fast Company)
  • Several carmakers received top marks from a European agency for the safety of their autopilot programs, but Tesla is lagging behind. (CNBC)
  • A New York Times writer spent the pandemic pedaling around the city and found some of its hidden gems.
  • A planned corridor for self-driving vehicles between Detroit and Ann Arbor could help bring manufacturing jobs back to the Motor City but raises questions about equity. (Crain’s)
  • Cambridge, Massachusetts mandated bike lanes on streets in its bicycle master plan in 2019, and now it’s put more teeth in the law by requiring most of those bike lanes to be built within the next six years. (Cambridge Bike Safety)
  • How can Duluth be considered a great town for the outdoors if it only has 12 miles of bike lanes? (Minneapolis Star-Tribune)
  • Bike crashes are down in Washington, D.C. this year, but they appear to be shifting to the outskirts of the city. (Greater Greater Washington)
  • Tucson, where drivers have killed 21 pedestrians so far this year, is adding more safety measures like HAWK signals. (KOLD)
  • A new video game lets players tinker around with redesigning Seattle streets. (Seattle Met)

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Image: Creative Commons

Study: Free Transit Helps Local Businesses

|
A new study finds that commuters with access to free public transportation don't drive any less — but they do take more leisure and shopping trips than those who have to pay their own fare, which could help provide local economies with the cash they need to provide a broader range of social services over time. 

U.S. Transit Trips Hit 10.2B in 2009, With Light Rail Up in Nine Cities

|
(Photo: Model D Media) The nation’s transit systems hosted 10.2 billion trips last year, the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) reported yesterday. While that figure represents a 3.8 percent decline from 2008, APTA’s data showed light rail ridership rising in nine cities and the long-term increase in transit use continuing to outpace growth in population […]

How Many Trips Are ‘Captured’ By More Diverse Urban Land Use?

|
Current methods of predicting the traffic-calming effects of mixed-use development are "woefully lacking" and risk underestimating the transportation benefits of more compact, diverse land use, according to a new report from the Transportation Research Board (TRB). An example of mixed-use development in San Francisco. (Photo: Arch. Record) The TRB report is the first to examine […]