Tuesday’s Headlines

  • Cycling deaths are up nationwide — especially in the Southeast — but cities like New York, Portland and Washington, D.C., are bucking the trend by investing heavily in bike infrastructure, according to a new study. (Bicycling) The League of American Bicyclists report, also covered by Streetsblog, suggests that encouraging walking and biking could help solve the nation’s obesity crisis, too. (Forbes)
  • Bike facilities could be a powerful tool for equity, but they’re not being used that way. Although workers who make less than $10,000 are the largest bloc of people who bike to work, and the majority of people who bike in low-income neighborhoods are non-white, urban investment in bike infrastructure tends to neglect them in favor of wealthy riders, says one Harvard expert. (WTOP)
  • Poor people and people of color on foot or on bikes are the most likely to be hurt in a traffic crash in Minneapolis, according to the city’s new Vision Zero study. (City Pages)
  • Des Moines is dramatically increasing its sidewalk construction, spending $60 million over the next 20 years to fill in 180 miles of gaps. (Register)
  • After spending the past five years or so disrupting the cab industry, Uber is disrupting itself by investing in scooters and bikes. (Bloomberg)
  • Philadelphia will never eliminate traffic deaths without more help from the Pennsylvania DOT, which controls the majority of the city’s most dangerous streets. (Inquirer)
  • By rejecting Prop 6 and opting not to repeal a gas-tax hike that funds transit as well as roads, California voters chose mobility over gridlock. (Mobility Lab)
  • Canada’s Globe and Mail kicks off a series on urban mobility with a piece on microtransit. (H/T to Streetsblog Denver)
  • After the Super Bowl debacle, Atlanta’s streetcar is the laughingstock of the nation. (Curbed)

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