Monday’s Headlines Can’t See You Up Here

Photo: Angie Schmitt
Photo: Angie Schmitt
  • You could pack 578 preschoolers into the blind spots of an F-150 (Streetsblog USA), but don’t expect the trend toward bigger, taller and deadlier vehicles to reverse anytime soon, because automakers are convinced vehicles like the 9,000-pound electric Hummer are what consumers want (Auto Week).
  • Transit agencies that went fare-free for public health reasons during the pandemic are now finding that the policy can help them win back riders, spurring a new emphasis on equity. (Thompson Reuters)
  • Despite the Biden administration’s talk about Complete Streets, it’s still largely letting states set their own goals for pedestrian deaths, per Trump-era standards, and won’t sanction them even if more people are killed. (Washington Post)
  • The future of transit is mobility hubs that integrate multiple modes of transportation. (Government Technology)
  • With gas prices averaging $4.20 a gallon (nice!), as CNBC reiterates, suspending the 18-cent federal gas tax won’t put much of a dent in the price at the pump.
  • Universities are at the forefront of the biking boom, with more than 200 earning bike-friendly status. (University Business)
  • Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg is in favor of Texas high-speed rail but ambivalent about widening I-35 in Austin. (KHOU)
  • The Washington state legislature approved $150 million in funding toward a Portland-Seattle-Vancouver high-speed rail line. That’s just a small portion of the overall $17 billion price tag, though. (Daily Hive)
  • Gov. Charlie Baker has proposed a $9.7 billion transportation bond bill that would help Massachusetts leverage federal grants for transit. (Streetsblog MASS)
  • Detroit is moving forward with plans to turn I-375 downtown into a surface boulevard. (WDET)
  • The $1.5 trillion spending bill President Biden signed last week includes an extension for Milwaukee streetcar funding. (Urban Milwaukee)
  • Pittsburgh is rolling out a new bike-share fleet that includes additional stations and e-bikes. (Tribune-Review)
  • Nashville officials think e-bikes are going to take cycling mainstream. (Government Technology)
  • Asheville is building a $3 million sidewalk in a formerly rural area that’s now residential due to infill development. (Citizen Times)
  • The D.C. suburb of Fairfax County, Virginia, is considering easing minimum parking requirements. (WTOP)
  • That silly D.C. trucker convoy was stymied last weekend by a one-person Critical Mass, a single cyclist taking the lane. Not all heroes wear capes. (Twitter)

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New Business Group Launches to Push Regional Electric Vehicles

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Washington’s love affair with electric vehicles continued today with the launch of the Electrification Coalition, an alliance of 13 companies hailing from the auto, shipping, and utility industries that have endorsed a $130 billion pitch for a region-by-region transition to battery-powered cars. The Coalition’s proposal was developed by consulting firm PRTM and Securing America’s Future […]