Friday’s Headlines Are Keeping It Real

Expectation: car commercial model soaring gleefully through an uncongested downtown. Reality: This. Image via  Creative Commons.
Expectation: car commercial model soaring gleefully through an uncongested downtown. Reality: This. Image via Creative Commons.
  • They’re expensive and deadly, not liberating and fun. So why not regulate car commercials like cigarette ads? (The Stranger)
  • Electric vehicles are already dangerous for pedestrians because they’re so quiet, and now Goodyear is developing a noise-reducing tire. (Jalopnik)
  • Too often police stop BIPOC individuals who are just riding their bikes or waiting for a bus. (Rocky Mountain PBS)
  • A referendum on gig worker benefits similar to California’s Prop 22 is closer to making it onto the Massachusetts ballot. (Boston Globe)
  • Months after a mass shooting at a San Jose train yard, Valley Transit employees are returning to work. (Mercury News)
  • The Federal Transit Administration is threatening to claw back a $37 million federal grant if St. Louis’ Delmar Loop trolley isn’t running again by June 1. (Post-Dispatch)
  • The Kansas City streetcar could potentially expand north across the Missouri River. (KSHB)
  • New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s legacy is eight years of more cars and more traffic deaths. (Streetsblog NYC)
  • Bike Portland wants Oregon to emulate Colorado’s new rule requiring the DOT to take into account climate change when approving road projects.
  • A coalition of nonprofits and housing advocates is working to ensure that gentrification doesn’t price out residents along Maryland’s Purple Line when the light rail line is completed. (Washington Post)
  • Complete Streets is one of the issues Atlantans want newly elected Mayor Andre Dickens to tackle. (AJC)

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America Has a Terrible Traffic Safety Record Because We Drive Too Much

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Even though the U.S. traffic fatality rate per mile driven has fallen by two-thirds in the last 50 years, America today still has the deadliest road system per capita in the developed world. Much of the improvement from safer driving and better emergency care has been wiped out by increases in total traffic. The American approach to traffic safety has emphasized seatbelt use, vehicle standards, […]