Thursday’s Headlines Are Crosseyed and Painless

  • Wednesday held out hope that an infrastructure deal might materialize, but you can probably guess what happened next. (Politico)
  • Breaking news: Nature is better than concrete at preventing climate change. (Reuters)
  • Planning to vote in Virginia elections on Tuesday? Hampton Roads transit won’t be collecting fares Nov. 2. (13 News Now)
  • Houston is repainting its bus-only lanes to make them safer. (Mass Transit)
  • Huntsville is using a $12.5 million federal grant to build a new bus transfer station downtown. (WAAY)
  • Myrtle Beach settled a lawsuit filed by the NAACP alleging that it discriminated against Black Bike Week against majority white Harley Week. (WPDE)
  • New bike lane alert: There’s one in Denver (9 News), more in Bakersfield (Californian) and another is coming to Tempe (KTAR).
  • The Spanish government wants to establish low-emissions zones in 149 cities, subsidize electric vehicles and spend more on transit (Eltis).
  • London is expanding its low-emissions zone where polluting vehicles have to pay to drive. (CNBC)
  • A $6.4 billion Wellington transportation plan doesn’t add a single car lane (New Zealand Herald).
  • Austria introduced a cheap “climate ticket” to encourage tourists to take electric trains into the mountains (CNN Travel).
  • Pixar movies even “Cars” are actually lowkey urbanist. (Common Edge)

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The Biden administration should pour billions of dollars into a variety of bike projects because the investment will generate thousands of jobs while also obviously greening the way Americans get around, advocates said this week, citing a new report on the economic benefits of cycling investments.
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Mayors Seek Transit Funds To Fight Climate Change

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A coalition of mayors wants Congress to declare a "Marshall Plan" against climate change by spending on mass transit to curb air pollution in their cities. The mayors of Atlanta, Honolulu, St. Paul, Pittsburgh, and Portland, Ore., implored senators at a climate hearing on Capitol Hill last week to invest in renewable-energy programs in order to create jobs and fund bus and rail systems, with the goal of weening people off gas-polluting vehicles.