Tuesday’s Headlines From Around the Nation

  • For 70 years, transportation planners have been using a flawed model to “prove” the need for more lanes and win federal highway funds, but the formula dramatically overestimates future traffic volume because it doesn’t take into account induced demand. (Vice)
  • Uber and Lyft’s legal battle with California could drag on for months. (Tech Crunch)
  • In 50 of the largest cities in the U.S., it’s easier to get to work by bike than transit. But this doesn’t seem to mean that these cities’ bike infrastructure is good so much as their transit systems are mostly bad. (New Geography)
  • Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) said during an Axios event on the future of transportation that the federal government should prioritize mass transit to help cities and states recover from the pandemic.
  • The Federal Transit Administration has launched a new forum for transit agencies to exchange ideas about pandemic recovery. (Progressive Railroading)
  • Portland elected officials and transit advocates have a fight on their hands as they seek to sell a $7 billion transportation package to voters. Business lobbying groups oppose the plan because it would be funded by payroll taxes. (Oregonian)
  • Austin’s $7 billion Project Connect isn’t the only transit plan on the ballot in Texas this November. Voters in San Antonio and Pflugerville will also decide on transit referendums. (Land Line)
  • Federal regulators gave preliminary approval for a New York City rail link to LaGuardia Airport that’s been decades in the making. (NBC New York)
  • The Twin Cities’ Metro Transit will return to mostly normal bus service in September. (WCCO)
  • Maryland’s transportation secretary denied claims made by Purple Line contractors related to cost overruns on the light rail project. (Bethesda Magazine)
  • A hearing in a lawsuit seeking to stop the expansion of I-30 through Little Rock resumes Wednesday. (Democrat-Gazette)
  • Pasadena cyclists took to the streets to protest the police shooting of Black man Anthony McClain. (Star-News)

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NACTO Comes to Boston

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For the next three days, the Boston region will host hundreds of transportation engineers, planners, and transit officials from dozens of cities worldwide for the annual conference of the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO).

Today’s Headlines

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(Image: Purdue University via Grist) Above is a map tracking where CO2 emissions from fossil fuels are originating — distressing news for cities? (Grist) LaHood gets lobbied to support direct aid to cities and more federal transit operating aid (Press-Enterprise, Current) A rallying cry for Congress to get behind federal aid for L.A.’s 30/10 transit […]