Monday’s Headlines From Around the Nation

  • Automakers are hoping that a newly germaphobic public will stop riding transit and buy cars instead (Bloomberg). But several studies have shown that motorists are more likely to spread coronavirus than subway riders (Planetizen). And transit remains a lifeline for essential workers and older people who must venture out for food and medicine (World Economic Forum). The coronavirus pandemic has shown how important transit systems are, as well as the need for stable sources of revenue, infrastructure investments and modernized fleets (The City Fix).
  • The Week examines three scenarios for post-pandemic traffic: it stays low, returns to normal or gets even worse.
  • Joe Biden wants a $1-trillion green infrastructure stimulus bill that would fund light rail and half a million electric vehicle chargers. (Politico)
  • Bike lanes boost businesses, according to a new Portland State University study. Researchers looked at 14 corridors in Portland, Seattle, San Francisco, Memphis, Minneapolis and Indianapolis, and found that bike lanes had a neutral or positive economic impact, especially on retailers and restaurants.
  • Washington, D.C. is putting concrete barriers in streets to expand sidewalks, and residents are clamoring for more (WAMU). In New York City, though, the sidewalks are too narrow for social distancing (Curbed, Streetsblog).
  • Charlotte’s transit agency plans to restore cut routes and reinstate fares once Gov. Roy Cooper lifts North Carolina’s stay-at-home order. (Plan Charlotte)
  • Philadelphia’s Indego bike-share turns 5 (WHYY) and Indianapolis’s Pacers bike-share celebrates its sixth anniversary (Fox 59).
  • Sao Paulo is spending almost $11 billion to expand its bus and rail system. (International Railway Journal)

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Young girls are as enthusiastic about biking as boys, but many lose interest in biking as they get older. Photo: Cameron Adams/Flickr

Why Do Teenage Girls Lose Interest in Biking?

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Jennifer Dill at Portland State University is taking a close look at why girls' attitudes about biking change over time. In a study of 300 Portland-area families, she observed that a gender gap in attitudes toward cycling isn't apparent in younger kids, but when girls reach adolescence, they don't view cycling as positively as boys do.