Wednesday’s Headlines

  • An addiction to sprawl, political dysfunction and a mistaken belief that transit ought to pay for itself are among the reasons why the U.S. is terrible at building public transportation compared to other countries. (Vice)
  • More transit agencies, including those in Kansas City (KCTV) and Toronto (Daily Hive), are deep-cleaning buses and trains in response to coronavirus. City Lab’s advice for minimizing risk of infection? Sanitize surfaces like subway railings and rental bike handles before touching them, and/or wash your hands afterward. Considering the virus’ range, “social distancing” is probably impractical unless transit agencies beef up service during peak hours.
  • Cities are looking for innovative solutions to improve worsening traffic congestion. (Reuters)
  • The D.C. Metro’s plan to lure drivers out of their cars with expanded bus service has turned into a “chaotic mess,” according to the Washington Post, with higher frequency but longer walks to stops and unpopular cutbacks in the suburbs and low-income areas.
  • Minneapolis wants more people to travel on foot, by bike or by bus than in cars by 2030, according to the city’s new transportation plan. That will require expanding transit, road diets and more bus-only lanes. (Star Tribune)
  • Last year, a Miami driver knocked over a flashing crosswalk beacon on Biscayne Boulevard. It and others haven’t been replaced, leaving thousands to pedestrians to dash for their lives across the busy five-lane road. (Herald)
  • A proposed light rail system could increase Austin taxes by more than 20%, triggering an election on rolling back taxes. But city officials think voters are ready to think big and willing to pay. (American-Statesman)
  • The Washington state legislature passed a law allowing Seattle to use cameras to catch drivers in bus lanes and blocking crosswalks. (Seattle Times)
  • One in five traffic deaths in Albuquerque occur on a single neglected three-mile stretch of Central Avenue. (Journal)
  • In the Israeli-occupied West Bank, where Palestinians’ movements are restricted, biking is a political act. (The Guardian)
  • Ladies and gentlemen, the president of the United States: