Monday’s Headlines

  • Drivers killed nearly 7,000 pedestrians in 2018, the highest figure since 1990, according to the Federal Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Cyclist deaths were also up 6% over 2017. (Smart Cities Dive, Streetsblog)
  • A bipartisan group of governors from a dozen East Coast states are working on a cap-and-trade plan to limit emissions from fossil fuel-powered cars and trucks. (Politico)
  • The Charlotte city council is expected to vote today on starting preliminary work for the 26-mile Silver Line. The project faces financial challenges: At over $6 billion, it’s several times more expensive than Charlotte’s previous light rail lines, and the feds are not expected to kick in as much money. Possibilities include public-private partnerships and raising a sales tax that funds transit. (Observer)
  • Sound Transit has rejected two proposed tunnels for a new rail line connecting Seattle and Ballard, citing the $650-million price tag. But a simpler and less expensive tunnel favored by Mayor Jenny Durkin is still on the table. Another alternative is a drawbridge, which would require massive ramps and could impede migrating salmon. (Seattle Times)
  • Gordon Chaffin of the newsletter Street Justice reports that an aide to Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser is holding up three protected bike lane projects.
  • A Montgomery County council member wants to clear the way for more development to raise tax revenue for a bus rapid transit line the Maryland DOT canceled. (Bethesda Mag)
  • Austin is contracting with a company called Swiftmile to open 10 e-scooter charging stations. (Tech Crunch)
  • Lime is pushing to bring more e-scooters to the Boston area (Curbed). Meanwhile, a committee of Georgia lawmakers is considering how to regulate e-scooters (AJC).
  • A driver was cited for killing a cyclist on a stretch of St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans where bike advocates said they’d sought a protected bike lane in 2017, but the city didn’t install one. (Advocate)
  • Copenhagen is drastically raising the price of residential parking to up to 4,000 kroner a year, or about $400, in an effort to keep cars out of the city. The exact rate is based on emissions and fuel efficiency. (Eltis)