Skip to Content
Streetsblog USA home
Streetsblog USA home
Log In
Bike Sharing

House Bill Proposes Big Jump in Bike-Share Funding

A group of federal lawmakers is trying to make it easier for cities to add and expand bike share — by treating it more like public transit.

Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Oregon), Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) and Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-Florida) — the chairs of Congress' Bike Caucus — this week introduced a bill known as the Bikeshare Transit Act of 2019. They proposed changing federal laws so that bike-share programs would be eligible for federal transit money and for a large-grant program that is dedicated (theoretically anyway) to improving air quality. If it is approved, the new law would make billions in new federal funds available to support bike share.

"Our legislation removes barriers facing new and existing bike-share projects seeking additional funding, giving more people options for efficient, carbon-free transportation,” Blumenauer said in a statement.

According to the National Association of City Transportation Officials, about 36.5 million trips were taken in 2018 on bike share, the vast majority in just a small handful cities that have made sizable investments in station-based systems.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog USA

Friday’s Headlines Take Me to the River

Politico reports that the Biden administration is investing $2.5 billion in updating aging Mississippi River locks and dams like this one in Iowa. Transporting freight by barge produces less emissions than trucks or even rail.

July 12, 2024

Friday Video: Take a Spin on Boston’s Electric Cargo Bike Share

Can't afford a $7,000 Urban Arrow cargo e-bike ? In Boston, you can now rent one for just a few bucks.

July 12, 2024

Talking Headways Podcast: Electrify the Rails

Adrianna Rizzo of Californians for Electric Rail on California's looming lobbyist-fueled hydrogen train mistake: "We’re locking in low service for potentially decades."

July 11, 2024

Thursday’s Headlines Drive Less

Seems obvious that the more people drive, the more likely they are to die in a crash or kill someone else, but traditional thinking on traffic safety doesn't always follow that logic, according to Planetizen.

July 11, 2024
See all posts