Thursday’s Headlines

  • Even algorithms can be biased, especially when they’re written by mostly white people. A new study found that autonomous vehicles have a harder time “seeing” dark-skinned pedestrians than light-skinned ones. (Vox)
  • Mobility Lab breaks down the different types of transit opponents and how to beat them.
  • Residents of Miami’s Biscayne Boulevard — which sees an average of 340 crashes a year — and other wide, fast roads are sick of living next to NASCAR speedways and want road diets to slow down traffic. (Herald)
  • New Orleans bike advocates say a protected bike lane on Esplanade Avenue could have saved the lives of two cyclists killed by an alleged drunk driver last weekend. The driver veered into the bike lane — which is only separated from cars by paint — at 80 miles per hour while trying to pass another car, according to witnesses, injuring seven other people. (The Advocate)
  • The Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority — the largest in the state, with 35 million annual riders — is asking for a bigger share of state transportation dollars. Gov. Mike DeWine has proposed splitting $40 million among 61 transit agencies. His proposed gas-tax hike would raise $1 billion for roads and bridges. (Plain Dealer)
  • Spokane, Wash., is set to ask the feds to pony up most of the $72 million for its planned Central City bus rapid transit line. (Spokesman-Review)
  • A top Montgomery County, Md. official thinks saving lives is too expensive and might inconvenience drivers. (WashCycle)
  • Vision Zero isn’t going so well in San Francisco. A 96-year-old man was the eighth person injured or killed by a driver there within a week. (SF Weekly)
  • Charlotte is on track to build a light-rail line to the airport by 2030, approving a route for the 25-mile, east-west Silver Line last week and preparing to ask voters to support a sales tax to fund it. (Agenda)
  • Stitch — a proposed park capping the freeway running through downtown Atlanta — could cost nearly half a billion dollars, according to the Urban Land Institute. (Curbed)
  • Operating costs for public transit in Montreal are projected to double to $1.7 billion over the next 10 years. Noting that roads are funded 100 percent by taxes, Mayor Valerie Plante called for a fundamental rethinking of how the city funds transit in order to reach climate-change goals. (Gazette)