Talking Headways Podcast: Designing Computer-Generated, 3D Cities

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This week, we’re joined by Matthias Buehler of Vrbn and David Wasserman of Fehr and Peers in a discussion of the City Engine program and how to create realistic cityscapes for movies and planning applications. We chat about the time it takes to code details, how much collected urban data sets can be used, and what these types of programs could be used for in the future.

 

 

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