Wednesday’s Headlines

  • Despite a few recent victories, Boston cyclists say the city’s bike-safety efforts remain anemic. Last week, a dump-truck driver struck and killed a cyclist on a stretch of roads that had been slated for bike lanes, but plans were dropped in favor of “driver convenience.” And a plan to build 195 miles of bike lanes by 2018 has fallen short by 100 miles. (Globe)
  • Former Atlanta councilwoman and two-time mayoral runner-up Mary Norwood is floating the idea of building a subway between the congested suburbs of Buckhead and Cobb County. Seems kind of ambitious for a region that until recently spent 40 years resisting transit altogether. (Curbed)
  • Boeing’s snub in 2001 spurred Dallas to build light rail and invest in creating a sense of place. For Amazon, it wasn’t enough. Will the latest rejection become a similar catalyst? (Morning News)
  • As Streetsblog previously reported, San Francisco residents memorialized people killed by drivers last week. It’s far from reaching its Vision Zero goal, but in contrast to many cities, San Francisco is getting safer for those on foot and bikes. Traffic deaths have dropped 50 percent since 2015, although some intersections remain dangerous. (ABC 7)
  • Drivers are killing fewer people on foot or bikes in Grand Rapids, Mich., too. (Fox 17)
  • Friends and family of traffic victims also marched in Austin on Sunday demanding change from the city and state governments. (Spectrum News)
  • Lyft is trying to make itself more attractive to drivers as it prepares for a public stock offering. (NY Mag)
  • After Oklahoma City resolved a disagreement with a contractor, its new streetcar is back on track to start rolling in December. (Oklahoman)
  • A 10-mile bike path along a narrow two-lane road connecting parks and reservations around Cleveland hit a snag when a consultant recommended mere sharrows (aka “chevrons of death”) instead. (Plain Dealer)
  • Lincoln, Neb., is taking public comment on a plan for 135 future bike projects. (Journal Star)
  • Tacoma, Wash., broke ground on a 2.4-mile streetcar extension Monday. (News Tribune)