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Congress for the New Urbanism

Petitioning U.S. DOT to Recognize That City Streets Should Prioritize Walking

4:28 PM EDT on June 10, 2013

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The Federal Highway Administration classifies roads as either "rural" or "urbanized." But the "urbanized" label is deceptive, because it applies suburban street design standards to any street that isn't rural. So if you live in, say, downtown St. Louis, the FHWA applies the same standards to your streets as to the streets in Orlando's most distant suburbs. This contributes to a horrendous mismatch: Many city streets where walking should take precedence are in fact designed for moving massive amounts of traffic.

Now there's a petition drive underway to change that. John Massengale, Victor Dover, and Richard Hall -- a team of planners and architects that are involved with the Congress for New Urbanism -- are circulating asking U.S. DOT to develop more city-friendly standards.

The trio recommends establishing separate standards for urban and suburban streets, introducing new priorities that place pedestrians first on city streets. From their letter to U.S. DOT:

The new standards for Urban Areas would be fundamentally different than the current Urbanized standards. Two-way streets, narrow traffic lanes, bicycle sharrows, and a prohibition on slip lanes and turn lanes would be the norm. In large cities, faster urban routes might be limited to broad boulevards and parkways. Small-town residential streets and Main Streets would be similarly transformed, according to their context.

The team calls their proposal a "simple but powerful idea could transform America's streets and make our neighborhoods, cities and towns more walkable." As of this afternoon, the petition needs only about 60 signatures to reach the goal of 500 supporters.

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