Friday’s Headlines: It Just Means More

Bill Haslam, left, helps unveil a sign announcing Knoxville as a Bicycle Friendly Community. ##http://www.bikeknoxville.blogspot.com/##Bike Knoxville##
Bill Haslam, left, helps unveil a sign announcing Knoxville as a Bicycle Friendly Community. ##http://www.bikeknoxville.blogspot.com/##Bike Knoxville##
  • The South has an often well-deserved reputation as a rural landscape punctuated by sprawling, auto-centric cities. But walkable SEC college towns like Knoxville are the exception to the rule. (Sports Illustrated)
  • Sexual harassment is a major problem on transit. (Transfers)
  • When considering whether to go fare-free, one way to look at it is whether transit is a public service that benefits everyone, like libraries or schools. (Christian Science Monitor)
  • Transit agencies draw employees who want to make a difference, and they want higher-ups to be less risk-averse. (Transit Center)
  • Billionaire CEO Tells Other Billionaire CEOs That Meeting Emissions Goals Will Be A Challenge (Wall Street Journal)
  • California’s plethora of paved surfaces is contributing to its flooding problem. (MSNBC)
  • The dream of high-speed rail in San Francisco isn’t dead, but only if the feds kick in a few billion dollars. (SFist)
  • Federal infrastructure funding will help design and plan a cap over Atlanta’s Downtown Connector. (Urbanize Atlanta)
  • Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot has revived the idea of using cameras to catch drivers who park in bike and bus lanes. (Sun-Times)
  • North Carolina’s Research Triangle is once again exploring commuter rail, but the failure of the Durham-Orange County line hangs over the project. (Governing)
  • A tunnel carrying the Capital Crescent bike trail through Bethesda alongside the Purple Line could be delayed due to rising costs. (Washington Post)
  • Nashville is the latest city to propose a subsidy for buying e-bikes. (WPLN)
  • The Kansas City streetcar is extending its hours, anticipating growing ridership during an event-filled spring. (KSHB)
  • Is Vision Zero working in Houston? Too early to tell traffic deaths declined in 2022, but remain above pre-pandemic levels. (Axios)
  • A developer plans to turn 17 acres on Houston’s East End into a car-free neighborhood. (Houston Public Media)
  • Did it set back ambitious transit plans for decades? Maybe. But it’s still hilarious. The Ringer recounts the history of “The Simpsons” famous monorail episode.

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