Friday’s Headlines Take You Home, Country Roads

Image: Complete Streets, CC
Image: Complete Streets, CC
  • While road safety initiatives often focus on urban areas, half of fatal crashes occur on rural roads, despite less than a fifth of the U.S. population living there. Dangerous infrastructure is a factor, as are drivers’ risky behaviors and lack of access to medical care. (Transportation Today)
  • Federal guidelines call for micromobility systems to serve low-income communities and people with disabilities, but rarely is there any follow-through or metrics to measure success. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • President Biden appointed a 26-person Infrastructure Advisory Council. (Transport Topics)
  • Should Californians vote to raise taxes on the rich to fund climate projects? The answer may seem clear, but critics say the referendum is a ploy by Lyft to get taxpayers to pay for a fleet of electric cars. (ABC 7)
  • Several years after the failed Durham-Orange light rail line, Durham officials are considering a new proposal for a commuter rail connection connection to Raleigh, this time using existing freight tracks and Amtrak trains. (News & Observer)
  • With Phoenix on the verge of setting a new record for traffic deaths, the city council voted to move forward on a Vision Zero plan. (Fox 10).
  • Cleveland’s Regional Transit Agency launched an ambassador program to assist riders and discourage disruptive behavior without involving armed law enforcement. (Scene)
  • Ohio leaders are widening a highway for a new Intel plant, of course, but also offering biking and walking options and looking at ways to connect it to public transportation. (WOSU)
  • Huntsville, Alabama, is in the process of planning a bus rapid transit system. (AL.com)
  • This is why we can’t have nice things: Salem, Oregon’s nonprofit bike share disbanded because all its bikes fell victim to theft or vandalism. (Oregon Public Broadcasting)
  • Bike, scooters and skateboards are getting more popular in Honolulu. (City Beat)
  • Salt Lake City could use its wide streets for things like linear parks or food truck plazas rather than cars. (Building Salt Lake)
  • St. Louis is painting colorful sidewalks celebrating Italian heritage in defiance of Federal Highway Administration policy. (Post-Dispatch)
  • Ms. Wheelchair Louisiana is calling on Baton Rouge to fix its sidewalks.  (WAFB)

 

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