Wednesday’s Headlines Are On a Health Kick

Image: Wikimedia
Image: Wikimedia
  • In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, transit agencies are refocusing resources on mainly minority and low-income riders who depend on the service, rather than white-collar suburbanites who might work from home indefinitely. (Wired)
  • A London study found that trips made by bike or on foot increased dramatically during the pandemic. (Traffic Technology Today)
  • Shared e-scooters may not be as environmentally friendly as you think. A Zurich study found that they mainly replaced cleaner modes like walking, biking and transit. (Futurity)
  • The infrastructure act’s funding for walking, biking and better land-use planning will improve the health of many Americans (Pew Trusts), and money to improve transit will also improve access to health care (Center for American Progress).
  • A “safe systems” approach to transportation safety uses street design and equitable enforcement to minimize deaths and injuries by minimizing driver error. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • Even though St. Paul has made great strides in bike-friendly infrastructure, the car is still king. (Streets.mn)
  • Car-centric Dallas is reconsidering its ridiculous 1960s-era minimum parking requirements — a spot for every 25 square feet of dance floor? — but it won’t transform all those asphalt lots overnight. (D Magazine)
  • Dallas is also starting to tackle a $2 billion backlog of sidewalk projects, although it’s only devoting $15 million over three years. (NBC DFW)
  • Santa Monica is offering low-cost housing to former residents who were displaced by freeway construction who want to return to the California city. (Los Angeles Times)
  • Atlanta’s transit agency is using a special fund to preserve existing affordable housing near transit lines. (Saporta Report)
  • The St. Louis Loop Trolley was more of a tourist attraction than actual transit, but that doesn’t mean it’s a bad idea to restart it. (NextSTL)
  • Charlotte’s new Gold Line streetcar will remain fare-free for the time being as it struggles with a driver shortage and reliability issues. (WBTV)
  • A Colorado Springs plan calls for removing Platte Avenue car lanes to make room for bikes and buses. (Gazette)
  • A massive snowstorm trapped Virginia motorists (Associated Press) and riders (Atlanta Journal-Constitution) for hours.
  • In related news, here’s a reminder that Washington, D.C. residents have eight hours to clear the sidewalks in front of their homes and businesses. (DCist)

 

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