Friday’s Headlines Are Back in Town

  • Intercity bus companies are asking for more funding in the upcoming reconciliation bill, and Democratic senators are also seeking $10 billion for transit that was stripped out of the Senate’s bipartisan bill. (Politico)
  • While some progressives are unhappy about the level of funding allocated to transit in the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill, Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown is talking it up in visits back home. (Government Technology)
  • Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey is seeking funding in the reconciliation bill to stormproof Boston subways in the wake of Hurricane Ida flooding. (Boston Globe)
  • Car-free pedestrian malls mostly failed in the 1970s, but they could still provide a model for today’s “open streets.” (City Lab)
  • Transit-oriented development makes streets safer for cyclists and pedestrians. (World Bank)
  • Streetsblog partner Streetfilms made its 1,000 video, on Montreal infrastructure.
  • More from City Lab: The developers of a car-free Arizona community are offering other transportation options at a discount to lure tenants.
  • The Oregon Transportation Commission granted preliminary approval to a Rose Quarter plan that involves widening I-5 in Portland but also capping it. (Oregon Public Broadcasting)
  • Widening I-35 in Austin won’t improve congestion, but it will encourage more driving and more sprawl, and destroy homes and businesses. (Texas Signal)
  • Everybody jaywalks, but Black people are more likely to be arrested for it in Los Angeles (LAist). The same bias exists in New York City, according to a previous Streetsblog NY investigation.
  • Maryland officials expect to have a new Purple Line contractor in place by February. (Washington Post)
  • San Francisco transit leaders are getting onboard Muni to talk to riders about a funding referendum in 2022. (Chronicle)
  • Las Vegas is seeking input about where to add new bike-share stations downtown. (Fox 5)

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG