Wednesday’s Headlines Are Burning Up

  • More on that UN climate change report: It’s here, it’s “unequivocally” manmade, it’s already causing extreme weather like hurricanes and wildfires, and the only question at this point is, how bad will we let it get? (CNN)
  • The infrastructure bill passed the Senate. (New York Times)
  • Amtrak is allocating almost half its $66 billion in funding from the infrastructure bill toward the Gateway project in New York and New Jersey alone. (Slate)
  • Thanks to decades of deregulation, freight haulers are latter-day robber barons standing in the way of Amtrak improvements and better passenger rail. (Washington Monthly)
  • During the pandemic, people found comfort in owning a car even if they didn’t use it much. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • Transit agencies’ workforces are strained at a time when they’re working to rebuild ridership. (Metro Magazine)
  • Cities need more than sidewalks, crosswalks and safer streets to get people walking. They need denser housing, places to walk to and inviting places to walk past. (Saporta Report)
  • Houston residents continued to push back against a proposed I-45 expansion right up until the close of public comment. (Houston Public Media)
  • Portland elected officials are pushing for congestion pricing and want to make sure any real-estate windfalls from a Rose Quarter cap accrue to Black property owners and not the Oregon DOT. (Willamette Week)
  • As Sound Transit wrangles with a projected budget shortfall, a West Seattle group is pushing gondolas as a cheaper alternative to light rail. (My Northwest)
  • Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf’s plan for a vehicle-miles-driven fee is running into trouble. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)
  • Las Vegas is using federal COVID funds to expand transit service. (Review-Journal)
  • Denver is turning over some of its shared streets back to cars. (CBS 4)

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Monday’s Headlines Are Ready for Departure

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The alarming new UN climate report underscores the need for cities to take back streets from cars and get more people on transit and bikes. (Smart Cities Dive) Urban areas are growing faster than rural ones, according to recently released U.S. Census data, which will be used to distribute transportation funding, among other things. (USA […]