Tuesday’s Headlines Are a House Divided

  • At last, the bipartisan infrastructure bill is poised for a final Senate vote this morning, sending it on to the House. (CNN)
  • The growing red-blue divide made negotiations over transit and highway spending even more contentious than usual. (NBC News)
  • We’ve delayed reducing fossil fuel consumption for so long that we can’t stop global warming, and the longer we wait the worse the disaster will become, according to a new UN report. (New York Times)
  • Climate change is already here, writes activist Bill McKibben, and in many ways we still don’t know how it will affect us. (New Yorker)
  • The success of this one open street in New York City could be replicated anywhere. (NYT)
  • Treasury secretary Janet Yellen visited Atlanta to promote the infrastructure bill with Sen. Raphael Warnock. (AJC)
  • Nashville has created a new multimodal transportation department that will prioritize road safety and biking and pedestrian projects. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • Seattle’s Sound Transit is accelerating plans to build three new light rail stations, but could delay others up to six years as it wrangles with a $6.5 billion shortfall. (The Stranger)
  • Portland’s TriMet and streetcar are finding it difficult to enforce the mask mandate on public transit. (KATU)
  • Sactown Magazine profiles Henry Li, the director of Sacramento Regional Transit who rebuilt the system to acclaim five years ago and is now dealing with the COVID crisis.
  • Madison is moving forward with bus rapid transit over objections from a vocal minority of downtown businesses (Isthmus). The Wisconsin capital is also lowering speed limits in some neighborhoods to 20 miles per hour (WMTV).
  • Richmond will spend $2.4 million to repair eight miles of sidewalks over the next year. (Times-Dispatch)
  • Car ads are encouraging Americans to drive recklessly. (Jalopnik)

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With just two work days left before the federal transportation funding source dips into the red, Congress is moving toward a high-stakes showdown over how to close the gap. Yesterday the Senate passed a bill to transfer $8 billion from the general fund to the Highway Trust Fund, which would keep things running until December […]