Wednesday’s Headlines Will Melt Your Face

  • The U.S. is the sixth-most expensive country in the world to build infrastructure in, and the five countries ahead of it all tunnel most of their projects, which adds to the cost. There are a lot of reasons for this, two of which are understaffed agencies and NIMBYs delaying projects. (Vox)
  • The Federal Transit Administration announced 49 grants totaling $182 million for low- and no-emissions buses. (Green Car Congress)
  • Women often avoid walking because they fear being sexually assaulted on the street. (Streetsblog USA)
  • Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer both want to fast-track the Gateway Program, a new rail tunnel underneath the Hudson River. (Politico)
  • The Pacific Northwest heat wave has shown that we’re not building our infrastructure to handle the more extreme climate of the 21st century. (The Atlantic)
  • Seattle’s top candidates for mayor all favor reduced fares or fare-free transit. The Seattle Times delves into their specific plans.
  • The goal of San Jose’s new mobility plan is to increase walking, biking and transit use from 24 percent of trips to 60 percent by 2040. (American City and County)
  • Drivers are killing so many pedestrians in San Antonio that it’s become a public health crisis. (Express-News)
  • Houston is adding wider sidewalks, bus shelters and additional lighting to Westheimer Road, the city’s busiest transit corridor. (Houston Public Media)
  • The Pittsburgh Port Authority eliminated a 25-cent discount for fare pass users, but also got rid of a $1 transfer fee. (City Paper)
  • Rural Virginians can now order transit service via an app, similar to a public version of Uber or Lyft. (Virginia Mercury)
  • In Roanoke, pedestrians are disproportionately likely to be injured or killed in traffic crashes. (Roanoke Times)

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How Seattle's Deep-Bore Highway Opponents Lost Their Own Referendum

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Opponents of Seattle’s deep-bore tunnel lost a big one yesterday. A voter referendum they hoped might kill the plan to replace the aging Alaskan Way Viaduct with a massive underground highway went down in a 60-40 vote, following a superior campaign by pro-tunnel forces. We’ve reported before how this exorbitantly expensive highway project will retrench […]