Monday’s Headlines and We’re On Our Way

  • President Joe Biden cut $500 billion from his infrastructure plan to entice Republicans, but predictably, the GOP still isn’t interested. (Politico)
  • Polls show that infrastructure spending is popular, and voters would likely support raising gas taxes, corporate taxes or taxes on the wealthy to fund it. (Forbes)
  • The number of pedestrians killed by drivers rose 21 percent last year despite a drop in overall travel, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association, most likely because of speeding and driving under the influence. (Route Fifty)
  • The problem with Ford’s new electric F-150 is its sheer weight makes it a menace to pedestrians that damages roads and pollutes the air with tire and brake dust. (Slate)
  • COVID-19 showed that access to transportation is a key component to health care, especially for Black and Latinx patients. (Transfers Magazine)
  • Reorienting commuter rail away from white-collar office workers and toward subway-style service in the wake of pandemic-driven changes in travel habits is going to be expensive. (Governing)
  • Citizen engagement is the key to restoring confidence in transit. (Cities Today)
  • Cities like Eugene and Ann Arbor are leading the way in creating more walkable communities where everyday needs are a 20-minute walk, bike ride or transit ride away. (Washington Post)
  • Georgia Sen. Jon Ossoff pressed Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg to fund light rail on the Beltline walking and biking trail during Buttigieg’s visit to Atlanta on Friday. (AJC)
  • A new maintenance facility near Seattle will allow Sound Transit to triple its light-rail fleet. (My Northwest)
  • A new Arizona law makes it illegal for drivers to even partially block a sidewalk so that a wheelchair can’t get by. (ABC 15)
  • Designing a freeway system doesn’t take a lot of brains — it’s so simple a slime mold could do it. (Jalopnik)

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