Monday’s Headlines

  • Ride-hailing roundup: A new lawsuit filed by New York Uber drivers alleges that the company illegally withheld taxes and charged riders a higher rate than it paid drivers, pocketing the difference (Washington Post). Uber also might have to send some money Google’s way after it came to light that Uber’s been using Waymo technology in its self-driving cars (Reuters). And Lyft is offering credits to users who sell their cars (Digital Trends)
  • Electric vehicle batteries are starting to pile up, and the industry needs to figure out a way to recycle them. (The Verge)
  • Not a day has gone by in Texas when a driver didn’t kill someone since 2000. (Houston Chronicle)
  • Westword thinks Denver’s Regional Transportation District — one of the most expensive transit systems in the country — should consider going fare-free to avoid a death spiral of fare hikes and service cuts.
  • Lyft will deploy 4,000 shared e-bikes in San Francisco under a new four-year contract with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency.
  • Transit is often so in demand that a new rail line brings gentrification along with mobility. That’s why a coalition of South Florida nonprofits is working to preserve affordable housing near the Brightline. (Next City)
  • Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker says he doesn’t support a gas-tax hike to pay for his $19-billion road and transit plan. Baker is one of a dozen East Coast governors who are banding together on an emissions tax instead. (Worcester Telegram)
  • WSOC looks at potential funding sources for the Silver Line, a proposed light-rail line in Charlotte.
  • Three Portland suburbs have agreed to join the regional transit service Metro and permanently fund commuter shuttles. (Press Herald)
  • EPA data shows that Phoenix has higher levels of a carcinogenic gas than any city in the country. (New Times)
  • A $90,000 loan will allow St. Louis’s fairly useless Delmar Loop trolley to keep running through the end of the year (Riverfront Times). Make sure you click through the links at the end.
  • It’s not “transit” the way that Streetsblog usually writes about transit, but it’s still pretty cool: Mercury will transit — pass across the face of — the sun today for the last time until 2032. So check it out if you can find access to a telescope. (Gizmodo)