Monday’s Headlines

  • Lyft lost nearly half a billion dollars in the third quarter, but revenue rose 63 percent, and the company says profitability is within reach. (The Verge)
  • In a few years, new battery technology could allow electric cars to absorb a 200-mile charge in just 10 minutes (The Guardian), but City Journal will likely have a problem with that, too!
  • The Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce released a plan to improve roads and public transit with congestion pricing, higher gas taxes and fees on Uber and Lyft rides (Globe). But Massachusetts’s transportation problems extend beyond Boston — 15 regional transit systems can’t afford to provide night service, and many don’t run on weekends, either (Daily Hampshire Gazette).
  • Baltimore business leaders are urging Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan to boost funding for transit, saying that Hogan’s plan to defer new projects for six years will hinder workers’ ability to get to their jobs. The system is already facing a $2-billion maintenance shortfall. (Sun)
  • A Miami-Dade transportation board voted unanimously in favor of elevated tracks for a Metrorail extension north to Miami Gardens over other options like maglev or a monoral. The county wants the feds to pick up half of the $1.9-billion price tag. (Miami Herald)
  • A New York City judge has dismissed Uber’s lawsuit challenging the city’s cap on the number of ride-hailing drivers. (Reuters)
  • A proposed Omaha ordinance would fix a loophole in the city code and fine drivers for parking in bike lanes, even when there’s not a no-parking sign. (World-Herald)
  • Streetcar roundup: The Hop in Milwaukee carried 740,000 riders in its first year of operation (Journal-Sentinel). In its sixth year, the Tucson streetcar hit five million riders (KGUN). Kansas City is ready to extend its streetcar to the south, offering access to some popular Main Street destinations (KSHB).
  • Despite privacy concerns, Sidewalk Labs, a subsidiary of Google parent company Alphabet, is moving forward with its “smart city” in Toronto. (Tech Crunch)
  • Graphic designer Jake Berman’s latest historical map shows what Cincinnati’s transit system looked like in 1912. (City Beat)