Monday’s Headlines

  • Gwinnett County’s Republican sheriff and district attorney have endorsed expanding transit in Atlanta’s largest suburb, which could help assuage voters’ (unfounded) fears that transit will bring crime to the area (AJC). Writing for Atlanta Magazine, an expert on autonomous vehicles defends investing in traditional rail and buses. Next City quotes Gwinnett officials as saying that even if the referendum fails, they’ll try again. It doesn’t look good: Early voting brought out mainly older, white voters who are likely to oppose transit (11 Alive).
  • House Democrats’ investigation into the Washington, D.C. Trump International hotel could derail a potential bipartisan deal on infrastructure. (NPR)
  • Uber plans to go public in April with a $120-billion stock offering. (CNBC)
  • Why did Lyft get into the e-scooter business? Scooter rides are more lucrative than cars because there’s no driver to take a cut. (Bloomberg)
  • The San Francisco Chronicle takes a deep dive into the Bay Area’s 11 biggest transportation projects, including Caltrain and BART expansion, bus rapid transit and subway lines.
  • A year after a failed transit referendum, Nashville Mayor David Briles is bringing up the possibility of light rail again. (WKRN)
  • NIMBYs are still in court trying to stop the Southwest Line in Minneapolis, even though the rail project has already broken ground. (Star Tribune)
  • Michigan’s proposed 45-cent gas-tax hike could fuel electric car sales. (Fox 47)
  • Portland protesters staged a die-in to urge the Oregon DOT to adopt Vision Zero (KATU). Meanwhile, TriMet’s multimodal trip planner will help riders combine transit with ride-hailing and bike-shares (Oregonian).
  • A legal challenge to the funding mechanism has stalled transit projects across Pennsylvania, and Pittsburgh wants its dang money. (Post-Gazette)
  • ICYMI: Streetfilms collected crazy anti-bike lane arguments, and there are some doozies.