It’s Our Annual Donation Drive (Sorry!)

It's our annual December donation drive. Please give from the heart (and wallet!) by clicking here. Thanks.
It's our annual December donation drive. Please give from the heart (and wallet!) by clicking here. Thanks.

If you want to know why the Trump Administration is holding up transit funding, what site are you going to read?

If you want to know how government officials and car makers conspire to cover up pedestrian deaths, what news source is going to dig deep?

If you want to nerd out on how mandatory parking rules ruin cities, who is going to nerd out with you?

These are rhetorical questions because the answer is clear: it’s Streetsblog! And we love doing it.

But every year around this time, we ask you — our loyal readers and fellow livable streets champions — to dig deep and make a small tax-deductible contribution to keep our brilliant team of writers and editors on the job for another year.

Every day this month, you’ll see this icon on every story. Just click the picture and you’ll be redirected to our donation form (don’t worry that it says “Streetsblog NYC” — we’re all one happy family).

SB Donation NYC header 2

It only takes a minute to save a life — or, in this case, help us keep fighting to reclaim our streets from the tyranny of the automobile through intense, focused, fact-based reporting that empowers Americans to demand change and forces the politicians to better serve the car-free majority.

We can’t do it without you, so please, give what you can. Thanks.

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