Talking Headways Podcast: Sharing a Ride to the Future

This week’s guest on Talking Headways is Zack Wasserman, head of global business development at Via, a ride-hailing company headquartered in New York. We talk about Via’s role as a trip provider, as well as a software builder for transit agencies, and how we can get more people sharing rides. We also discuss how transportation systems are likely to change in lower density places and the role of technological and policy innovation in both the public and private transportation sectors.

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Talking Headways Podcast: The Three Revolutions of Transportation

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This week, author Daniel Sperling joins us to talk about his new book, Three Revolutions, which examines the potential sea change in transportation as a result of electrification, automation, and shared rides. We discuss how he came to believe that shared rides are the future, the role of regulation during these transformations, and what all this change means for auto manufacturers.

Talking Headways Podcast: Pro·pin·qui·ty

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This week's illustrious guests are Robert Cervero, Erick Guerra, and Stefan Al, who tell us all about their new book, Beyond Mobility. We discuss how to recalibrate cities to put people first when we shape transportation and the built environment, silly regulations like requiring parking space per toilet seat, and the best transportation and planning practices the U.S. should borrow from around the world.

Talking Headways Podcast: Sharing (Your Bike, Car, Bus) Is Caring

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This week we’re chatting with Sharon Feigon of the Shared Use Mobility Center. Bike-share, car-share, ride-hailing — we talk about all of that and then some, including how these new services may shape the built environment. Sharon discusses what new research says about who’s using shared transport services and how even the “super sharer” still relies on transit […]

Talking Headways Podcast: The Logistics of Urban Deliveries

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This week's guest is Tom Madrecki, director of urban innovation and mobility at UPS. If you want to know how a huge logistics company like UPS thinks about city streets and transportation systems, don't miss this one. Tom discusses the costs of congestion to UPS, and why streets that prioritize solo car trips don't work for walking, biking, or deliveries.