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The Koch Brothers Win: Nashville Abandons “Amp” BRT Plans

Nashville's bid to build its first high-capacity transit line is dead, the Tennessean is reporting today. It's a victory for the Koch brothers-funded local chapter of Americans for Prosperity and a defeat for the city's near-term hopes of transitioning to less congested, more sustainable streets.

Nashville's 7-mile "Amp" BRT was part of a larger vision for a better connected, more efficient region. Image: AMP Yes
Nashville's 7-mile "Amp" BRT was envisioned as the beginning of a more connected transit network and less car dependent city. Image: AMP Yes
Nashville's 7-mile "Amp" BRT was part of a larger vision for a better connected, more efficient region. Image: AMP Yes

The project, known as the Amp, called for a 7-mile busway linking growing East Nashville to downtown and parts of the city's west end. Civic leaders hoped it would be the first of many high-capacity bus routes that would help make the growing city more attractive and competitive.

But Mayor Karl Dean, facing organized opposition to the project, announced late last year that he would not try to start building the Amp before he leaves office later in 2015.  This week the city's leading transit official made it official and stopped design work on the Amp, The Tennessean reports.

The opposition group "Stop Amp" was led by local car dealership impresario Lee Beaman and limousine company owner Rick Williams, according to the Tennessean. The group also had help from the Koch brothers, with the local chapter of Americans for Prosperity introducing a bill in the State Senate that would have outlawed dedicated transit lanes throughout  Tennessee. Opponents fell short of that, but Republicans in the legislature were a constant obstacle to the project's funding.

Transit supporters in Nashville are now left to pick up the pieces and figure out what comes next. "We've never come so far in bringing this level of mass transit to Nashville, and we have to continue the conversation to make it a reality," Dean said in a statement last week.

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