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Al Gore

Bloomberg Declares Support for a National Carbon Tax

11:45 AM EDT on November 2, 2007

New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg will
declare his support today for a national carbon tax, according to a
report posted this morning on the New York Times City Room blog by
metro reporter Sewell Chan:

Mayor Bloomberg plansto announce today his support for a national carbon tax. In what hisaides are calling one of the most significant policy addresses of hissecond and final term, the mayor will argue that directly taxingemissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that contributeto climate change will slow globalwarming, promote economic growth and stimulate technological innovation— even if it results in higher gasoline prices in the short term.

Mr.Bloomberg is scheduled to present his carbon tax proposal in a speechthis afternoon at a two-day climate protection summit in Seattleorganized by the United States Conference of Mayors. (A copy of the speech was provided to The New York Times by aides to the mayor; the full text is available here, along with the complete Times story.)

Needless to say, Charles Komanoff at the recently spiffed-up Carbon Tax Center, thinks this is a big deal (worthy of an Oscar or a Nobel Peace Prize, perhaps?):

With his speech today, Mayor Bloomberg joins former Vice-President AlGore as the nation's leading advocates of a carbon tax to cap andreduce carbon emissions from fossil fuels.

And consistent with the Mayor's local transportation policy push:

Bloomberg's support of a U.S. carbon tax is philosophically consistentwith his big current local initiative, a congestion pricing plan toimprove mobility, economic activity and the quality of life in theManhattan Central Business District by charging an entry fee for motorvehicles. A carbon tax and congestion pricing both embody the principlethat safeguarding “the commons” -- our air, water and public space --requires that we exact from ourselves a commensurate price for usesthat damage or deplete it.

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