Today’s Headlines

  • Sen. Carper Pushes for Long-Term Transpo Bill (The Hill)
  • GOP Senate Candidate Proposes Slashing Gas Tax, Giving States Control (Detroit News)
  • Did San Antonio’s Streetcar Plan Die When Julian Castro Left? (Texas Observer)
  • Audit Uncovers Sweetheart Deals, Other Problems With Utah Transit Authority (Salt Lake Trib)
  • Latin America Leads the Way on BRT (Guardian)
  • Twin Cities’ Green Line Could Use More Parks (Star Trib)
  • Sen. Schumer Calls on Feds to Fund Penn Station Annex (NYT)
  • Arlington Looks South to Norfolk’s Debate Over Light Rail Fares (Inside Nova)
  • Houston Gets its First Dedicated Bike Lane Downtown (Houston Chron)
  • Saying Goodbye to Your Car Can Be Easier Said Than Done (CityLab)
  • Bolwerk

    Would it kill journalists to look at the economics of transit rather than to just believe the Gospel of Enrique Pen?alosa? They compare capital costs, and completely ignore buses’ permanent upfront higher operating costs. Heck, that buses have shorter service lives than rail even implies that capital costs are higher than a mere upfront comparison suggests. Bogota labor is presumably cheaper than first world labor, so they can eat these higher operating costs, and come out ahead for eschewing significantly higher capital costs that may even have to be financed in a foreign currency. This should be pretty “duh” stuff for anyone with a cursory knowledge of business or economics journalism.

    Buses are always going to be a piece of the transit landscape but, no, they are not uniform “the future of urban transit” anymore than dollar vans are. A good idea in Bogota is not necessarily a good idea in New York or Berlin.