Exxon: ‘One Mega-Highway, Please.’ Texas: ‘Coming Right Up’

It’s generally difficult to determine exactly how and to what extent the shadowy hand of Big Oil is at work in our publicly funded infrastructure decisions.

ExxonMobil wants to move its headquarters 10 miles further from the city of Houston. And that's all the reason Texas needs to spend $5.2 billion on a highway. Photo: ##http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-02-24/exxon-shell-bp-said-to-have-been-hacked-through-chinese-internet-servers.html##Bloomberg##

Some of the more notable exceptions over the past few years have included the Koch Brothers-Scott Walker Wisconsin roads bonanza. Or the attempted assassination of the Cincinnati Streetcar by Ohio’s asphalt lobbiest-turned-DOT Director, Jerry Wray.

But Texas has just taken self-interested interference in public infrastructure projects by an oil company to a whole new level.

Nevermind that the state can’t afford it. Or that the region doesn’t have the congestion to justify it. The Houston region is renewing its push for a $5.2 billion third outerbelt at the behest of ExxonMobil.

According to the Houston Chronicle, the state is short about $315 billion — with a b — short of what is needed just to keep its existing highways in good repair and moving smoothly.

But Exxon has apparently pulled the well-worn trump card for private businesses seeking massive public subsidy in the form of roadways: it has threatened to leave the region. The multinational oil corporation has plans for a 385-acre campus, naturally, outside the reach of Houston’s two existing outerbelts, according to the Huffington Post.

The commission’s vote in support of the project was unanimous, and if all goes as planned, the segments of the road adjoining ExxonMobil will go online just as the company’s new campus, which sits about 10 miles up the road from its old campus, is completed in 2015.

David Crossley, the president of Houston Tomorrow, which studies urban issues in the region, said that “six months ago the Parkway project was essentially dead. But when Exxon began to close in on their decision, everything started going really fast. It’s breathtaking how they got this going again.”

Houston real estate developer and transportation commissioner Ned Holmes said last winter that “Exxon representatives have stated very clearly to me that TxDOT moving forward on the Grand Parkway is essential, and that if that did not happen, they would not select this site,” according to Houston Tomorrow.
Holmes added that it was “kind of a deal-breaker” for the company, according to the organization.

The best part is, after Exxon collects its multi-billion-dollar road subsidy from the state of Texas, residents of greater Houston will be forced to drive further distances in a more sprawling region, adding to Exxon’s bottom line.

Oil subsidies. And you thought they were just corporate tax breaks and military intervention.

  • Anonymous

    The problem with the beltway system is the interior gets crushed under the traffic pressure of all of those people driving in… think gravitational collapse of a star.   This is a total disaster and clearly shows how hopefully corrupt our political system is.  Of course, I rejected Houston long ago as a possible live/work destination: even two rings is too many.

  • Anonymous

    The problem with the beltway system is the interior gets crushed under the traffic pressure of all of those people driving in… think gravitational collapse of a star.   This is a total disaster and clearly shows how hopefully corrupt our political system is.  Of course, I rejected Houston long ago as a possible live/work destination: even two rings is too many.

  • Grumpy Progressive

    Nice work, Houston GAC and TxDOT.  I see you are really into Livable and Progressive measures there!  Sad times….

  • To a man with a hammer, every problem is a nail. To a company with oil wells, every answer is a highway.

  • Yes, I also think this is a total disaster and clearly shows how hopefully corrupt our political system is.

  • Nice, Texas. And you wonder why people don’t want to live there.

  • R Guinart

    Streetsblog failed to outline the history of this project, as well as the recent, politically sensitive, back-and-forth between the State’s DOT and the surrounding County’s right-to-build authority. Not including these important items as bookends/caveats makes the outcome appear more immediate, more crony than it perhaps was. Unfortunate.

  • Anonymous

    For the past century, the governing mantra within the roadbuilding-land development nexus (which became deeply embedded in a crony-capitalist institutional environment driving Texas politics and benefiting many of its societal elites who figured out how to option strategically-located lands well in advance of any actual highway construction commitment) has consistently been “money talks and b******* walks….”  The “windfall” profits have been laundered into political campaign contributions over enough electoral cycles through the decades to ensure that those who fund successful Gubernatorial and Legislative campaigns also have supportive appointees placed on the Highway/Transportation Commission to assure the next round of profitable land-highway ventures will be facilitated in their metropolitan regions by sparking the next boomlet in local land markets.

  • hikusar

    There’s a reason 80% of the people who live in Houston are not from Houston. All who grow up there get out if they can.

  • Roads2rail

    It’s being developed as a toll road.  Exxon and the other workers that will go on that road will pay for its own development.

    Also, you state that the Houston region doesn’t have the congestion to justify additional road building.  It has been one of the few cities that has been able to add hwy and lanes of traffic and either reduce or maintain (even with the phenomenal pop. growth) traffic speeds and mobility.  Through planning they have been able to prepare for the growth they have experienced.  Lack of roadway planning is the problem with DC and LA.  Those are some of the most messed up hwy systems.    

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