T4America Maps TIGER Grantees: Find One Near You!

Thanks to Transportation for America for putting together this handy-dandy map of TIGER recipients. It shows the geographical reach of the program, as well as the broad range of projects benefitting from the grants. Note that this map does not show planning grants.

T4America says:

In two batches in February and October 2010, USDOT gave out a total of $2.1 billion for innovative transportation projects that address economic, environmental and travel issues at once. The TIGER program, as its known (Transportation Investments Generating Economic Recovery), is a competitive and merit-based process to pick projects and should be a model for next transportation authorization.

“Almost all of these projects have two things in common,” said T4 America director James Corless. ”They will all create desperately-needed jobs while building critical transportation infrastructure, and they have a hard time getting funded under the outdated structure of the current federal transportation program. These projects in communities across the country will create good paying jobs, spur local economic development, and keep our metro and rural areas connected. The administration is responding to the demand for funding that can help make communities of all sizes more livable, more competitive and more connected.”

  • Ian Turner

    The main thing I take away from this map is that New York is getting the shaft.

  • Andy

    No love for upstate NY?

  • It looks like not every project is in the T4A database yet. NYC’s most exciting TIGER grant — the Sheridan teardown study — isn’t showing up. The first round of grants also funded phase one of Moynihan Station work, which I don’t see here.

  • Jass

    Actually, it seems that the territories got screwed over. I know San Juan has a plan for an extensive streetcar system to connect with their metro.

    Of course, they don’t pay federal taxes, so they can’t complain too much.

  • Hey Ben, we actually left out the TIGER II planning grants to keep the map focused entirely on the capital grants that were definitely going to build things soon, in some cases breaking ground within weeks or months. The planning grants are a mix of things that may be built (or torn down in the case of the Sheridan) or just studied for a future project. Also complicating things is that the TIGER II planning grants included the joint challenge grants with HUD that are a little harder to describe with a pithy short description. It was hard to include the planning grants without including those.

    We’re open to hearing suggestions either way, but we felt like keeping the map limited to the capital grants was the best way to go.

  • I think it would help to see the planning grants to give a complete sense of the geographic distribution. And also to see what sort of planning is getting funded. The plans may not come to pass, but at least in the case of the Sheridan, the funding will bring a cutting edge project closer to reality.