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Podcast: Who Gets Hurt When Cities Ban E-Scooters?

Photo: AR, CC

Across the U.S., city leaders have reacted to safety concerns about the shared e-scooter industry with fleet curfews, neighborhood restrictions, and even outright bans. Those blunt policies, though, might hurt more people than they help — especially when it comes to socially and racially marginalized communities without other ways to get around.

On today's special edition of The Brake, we're re-broadcasting an episode of Charles T. Brown's Arrested Mobility podcast that centered around what happened when St. Louis forced e-scooters out of its downtown (featuring an interview with our own host Kea Wilson, who covered the story for Streetsblog last year). And along the way, we'll explore why so many places beyond Missouri's borders have enacted similar policies — and why Black and brown Americans, in particular, deserve so much more from their transportation leaders.

Tune in below, on Apple Podcasts, or anywhere else you listen.

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