Tuesday’s Headlines Get Moving

Image: C-SPAN, screenshot
Image: C-SPAN, screenshot
  • The White House is hoping to speed up the permitting process for infrastructure projects without compromising environmental standards. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • The U.S. Postal Service should consider using solar-powered cargo bikes to deliver mail instead of its controversial gas-guzzling new trucks. (Electrek)
  • Drivers claim to be persecuted by things like congestion pricing and spending on bike lanes, but the reality is, they still rule the road. (Forbes)
  • New D.C. Metro chief Randy Clarke, recently hired away from Austin’s Cap Metro, believes ridership will recover from its pandemic dip. (Washington Post)
  • Chicago bike-lane czar David Smith talks to WBEZ about cyclists’ safety concerns and how the city decides where to build bike infrastructure.
  • New York City Mayor Eric Adams has endorsed a plan to turn a quarter of street space into bike and bus lanes, pedestrian plazas and parks. (Time Out)
  • Traffic deaths are up again in Austin, where drivers killed 13 people in April alone, including six pedestrians. (American-Statesman)
  • L.A.’s Van Nuys light-rail line has received a $900 million federal grant. (Urbanize Los Angeles)
  • Increased housing density will reduce the need for cars, writes Martin Luther King III. (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)
  • San Francisco is testing new technology to keep e-scooters off sidewalks. (Chronicle)
  • Spin and Wheels are out and Bird is in as Seattle bike-share operators. (Seattle Bike Blog)
  • Detroit bike-share MoGo is offering monthly free rides through October. (Free Press)
  • Even Giants and Jets fans got a kick out of it when Tom Brady rode a bike through New York City. (USA Today)

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