Wednesday’s Headlines Are Running Out of Time

  • How do we cut greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030? Pretty simple: Phase out vehicles powered by fossil fuels and invest in transit. (Fast Company)
  • TimeOut wonders if Walmart and Amazon billionaire’s plans for a new Mega-City One in the middle of some desert is greenwashing. The Guardian has a pretty definitive answer.
  • Some combination of vehicle-miles-driven and congestion-based tax could both encourage electric vehicles and discourage driving overall. (Clean Technica)
  • Remote work isn’t killing cities, but it is encouraging sprawl in those cities. (Business Insider)
  • Add Baltimore’s Druid Hill Park to the list of Black neighborhoods decimated by freeways. (Washington Post)
  • Your neighborhood can either be car-friendly or child-friendly. Pick one. (Greater Greater Washington)
  • San Diego officials are now considering how many cars will be put on the road when approving new developments. (Union-Tribune)
  • Detroit might be the “Motor City,” but a third of residents don’t own cars, and they’re tired of waiting on buses because of a driver shortage. (Crain’s)
  • Less than a week after it started running, Charlotte’s Gold Line streetcar extension is apparently already doomed by pandemic ridership drops and a looming fare hike. (WFAE)
  • Remember the fun, frivolous, early aughts internet? Uber drivers have some taxicab confessions. Size really does matter — and not just for pickup trucks.  (Buzzfeed)

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