Tuesday’s Headlines Want You to Slow Down

  • Drivers kill as many people in the U.S. as guns. It’s a public health epidemic, and most of those deaths are preventable if we stop engineering roads for speed. (Vox)
  • The pandemic and inequality in transportation have both disproportionately affected Black and brown communities. (Washington Post)
  • CommonWealth magazine calls for incentives for e-bikes, more equitable transportation spending and safer bike infrastructure.
  • Gentrification isn’t caused by bike lanes it’s caused by a cycle of disinvestment and capital influx that draws people with suburban attitudes to cities. (Substack)
  • NPR profiles an Afghan former military translator who was forced to become an Uber driver because he couldn’t find other work after escaping his war-torn homeland.
  • The decline in peak-hour demand is allowing the Twin Cities’ Metro Transit to get creative by lowering fares, handing out passes to apartment-dwellers and beefing up service to schools. (MinnPost)
  • The feds won’t intervene in a dispute among New York, New Jersey and Connecticut over how to share $14 billion in COVID-19 transit funding. (NY Daily News)
  • Charlotte area leaders still have no timetable for moving forward with a $13 billion regional transit plan. (WFAE)
  • I-35 is responsible for a quarter of Austin’s traffic deaths, and adding lanes won’t make it any safer. (Chronicle)
  • Biking in Anchorage is dangerous because the city neglects bike infrastructure. (Daily News)
  • Detroit buses and the QLINE streetcar now have a transit-only lane on major downtown thoroughfare Woodward Avenue. (Free Press)
  • Pittsburgh’s director of mobility is leaving to take a job with the Federal Transit Administration. (WESA)
  • Portland’s bike-share is offering free rides to college students on financial aid, as well as all residents who qualify for social services. (Oregonian)

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