Monday’s Headlines Touched the Face of God

  • As the pandemic eases, transit agencies will have to staff back up, as well as transition away from social distancing requirements and costly, unnecessary sanitation protocols without spooking riders. (Transit Center)
  • Stimulus and unemployment checks aren’t what’s keeping drivers from going back to work for Uber and Lyft. Drivers have simply realized the job sucks. (Motherboard)
  • Regional leaders think the federal government should provide more flexibility on infrastructure funding and spend more money on major, transformative projects. (Brookings Institute)
  • The urban planning website Strong Towns has a released a book about how engineers tend to do things because that’s the way they’re done, which is why the ability to drive fast is usually their priority when designing roads.
  • It’s not just ocean levels that are rising. Climate change is battering Chicago, where Lake Michigan’s levels lately vary by as much as six feet. (New York Times)
  • The L.A. Metro will go fare-free for students and will no longer call police on unhoused people using the transit system, its CEO announced. (Los Angeles Daily News)
  • Atlanta officials are hoping that renewed federal interest in infrastructure and healing the highway scars slashing through cities will result in funds to cap the Downtown Connector with greenspace. (Urbanize)
  • By narrowing car lanes, Bloomington found a way to install a protected bike path on Seventh Street while also leaving room for a bus lane. (Indiana Public Media)
  • St. Pete Beach is the first city in Pinellas County, Florida, to adopt a Vision Zero resolution. (Tampa Bay Newspapers)
  • Fort Lauderdale is the latest city to fall for Elon Musk’s tunnel scam. (Vox)
  • El Paso officials hope drivers see its new neon-colored crosswalks. (KTSM)
  • St. Louis cyclists share their favorite rides in the region. (St. Louis Public Radio)
  • Billionaires in spaaaaaace! (CNN)

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Monday’s Headlines to Start Your Week

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Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and other key Democrats are backing transit agencies’ pitch for $32 billion in coronavirus relief funding, although Republicans have not included it in their bill. (Washington Post) Paint won’t cut it — to get most people to bike, you have to provide barriers to separate them from cars. (ITS International) […]

To Put Transit on Stronger Footing, Stop Lavish Subsidies for Driving

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There’s an interesting conversation happening in urbanism circles about how to make transit financially sustainable, going back to a piece in CityLab last June from University of Minnesota professor David Levinson. Levinson made the case for running transit like a public utility, not a government agency. There’s one thing that’s largely missing from these discussions, argues Cap’n Transit, […]