Monday’s Headlines to Kick Off a Long Week

A caravan of truck-driving Trump supporters tried to run a Biden campaign bus off the road in Texas, with an approving nod from the president (NPR). The FBI is investigating (Vox).

News stories about drivers killing cyclists and pedestrians often subtly blame the victim by using passive voice and treat crashes as isolated incidents rather than a systemic problem. (Transfer Magazine)

Infrastructure has always been a bipartisan issue, but not anymore. (The Hill)

The deteriorating Hudson River Tunnel and a Florida highway that’s one of the deadliest in the nation are two of the infrastructure projects Smart Cities Dive calls disasters waiting to happen.

The pandemic isn’t the only reason transit systems in the Northeast are struggling. They never fully recovered from Hurricane Sandy eight years ago. (Associated Press)

Uber promised immigrants and people of color stable jobs as drivers, but instead has given them low pay and no benefits. (The Guardian)

Lyft’s head of transit says changes cities have made to encourage biking and scooter use during the pandemic should be made permanent. (Business Insider)

San Francisco’s plan for a bike-friendly Market Street has fallen prey to pandemic-driven budget cuts. (SF Chronicle)

Philadelphia commuters want the next administration to expand transit into the suburbs, fix potholes, enforce traffic violations, build up the EV-charging infrastructure and do more to help the disabled navigate transit. (WHYY)

Madison, Wisconsin, wants to formalize zoning regulations requiring developers to encouraging biking and transit use and discourage driving. (State Journal)

Memphis can’t afford to fully fund transit, but it can afford $62 million for more downtown parking. (Commercial Appeal)

The Metro Atlanta Transit Authority is partnering with Uber to help riders get to polling places on Election Day located along lines where service isn’t available during the pandemic, kicking off a one-year pilot project. (Transportation Today)

E-scooters are now available in downtown St. Petersburg. (CW44)

This Google-Maps-meets-time-travel website lets you see what your city looked like up to 100 years ago. (Fast Company)

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