Wednesday’s Headlines From All Over the Place

  • More than 50 years after the Federal Railroad Administration first recommended it, most railroads are on track to install an automated braking system called positive train control by December. Congress finally mandated the technology after a deadly 2008 train crash in California, but the deadline was extended several times. (Washington Post)
  • Uber is falling behind in the race to develop a viable self-driving car, and investors are not happy about it. (Bloomberg)
  • The Federal Railroad Administration gave final clearance for a privately built and financed high-speed rail line between Houston and Dallas, but it is likely to be challenged in court. (Houston Chronicle)
  • Indianapolis businesses love the Massachusetts Avenue street closure, but a 50-year contract with a company that collects parking fines means the city can’t make it permanent. (Star)
  • Honolulu budgeted $1.4 billion to build a light-rail extension, but one company’s bid is over $2 billion, the CEO revealed on an earnings call. (Civil Beat)
  • Omaha is experimenting with an app that allows delivery drivers to find, reserve and pay for curb space. (Streetsblog)
  • Philadelphia’s five-lane Washington Avenue is going on a road diet that will replace car lanes with bike lanes, bus islands and loading zones. (WHYY)
  • A bus rapid transit line connecting downtown Pittsburgh and the Oakland neighborhood is slated to open in 2023. (Post-Gazette)
  • Tampa officials hope colorful street murals imitating bulb-outs will be a quick and cheap way of keeping pedestrians safer while also beautifying Ashley Drive. (Tampa Bay Times)
  • Boulder received a Colorado state grant for shared streets and street closures. (Times-Call)
  • Uber has entered into a partnership with Renault and Nissan to supply electric cars to drivers in Europe. (Clean Technica
  • Dutch e-bike startup Van Moof — the company whose recent TV commercial was banned in France, as we reported — raised $40 million from venture capitalists. (CNN)
  • British Columbia quadrupled the fine for dooring a cyclist to $368. (Daily Hive)
  • A Toronto poll found that 84 percent of residents want more protected bike lanes. (CBC)

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