Thursday’s Headlines from All Over

  • The backup driver in an autonomous Uber that killed a woman crossing the street in Arizona has been charged with negligent homicide (New York Times). But is that enough? The driver’s employer, the automaker and the designer of the road all share the blame (Streetsblog USA).
  • Transportation for America is organizing a tweetstorm today urging Congress to provide $32 billion in emergency funding for transit agencies. Tweet at your federal representatives — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is @senatemajldr) using the hashtag #SaveTransit.
  • With a key surface transportation bill set to expire at the end of the month, Congress can’t agree on an extension or a replacement. (Transport Topics)
  • Joe Biden has a detailed infrastructure plan, and President Trump does not. (Logistics Management)
  • Uber and Lyft are in it for the long haul when it comes to fighting against drivers’ labor rights. (Jacobin)
  • Dozens of cities turned streets into pedestrian malls to revitalize downtowns in the 1960s and ’70s. Most failed, but the ones that survived have a few things in common: high population density, low median age and short lengths. (Fast Company)
  • Smart Cities Dive interviews a Harvard professor about his new best-practices guidelines for micromobility pilot projects.
  • Maryland transit officials promised they’ll finish the Purple Line despite a dispute with contractors. (WTOP)
  • Bay Area Rapid Transit received its largest-ever grant, $1.2 billion from the Federal Transit Administration, to expand service and prepare for riders to return once the pandemic ends. (Streetsblog California)
  • The Texas DOT is considering turning a Houston toll road into an elevated highway with bus-only and carpool lanes. (Chronicle)
  • The world’s longest underwater road and rail tunnel will connect Germany and Denmark. (Arch Daily)
  • A Vancouver city council member wants to get rid of parking minimums for new development. (CBC)

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The Red Line bus rapid transit project in Indianapolis, which voters approved as part of a package in November, is one of dozens of projects threatened by Donald Trump's budget proposal. Image: IndyGo

Think of Trump’s Budget as an Attack on Cities

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Yesterday Donald Trump released a budget outline that calls for severe cuts to transit, and the reaction was swift and scathing. The National Association of City Transportation Officials called it "a disaster" for cities. Transportation for America said it was a "slap in the face" for local communities that have raised funds to expand transit.

Why a Republican Congress is Good For Bike Advocates

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I am one of the nearly 800 bike advocates from around the country who went to Washington, D.C. last week for the National Bike Summit. I took away an important lesson: The Republican Congress is good for bicycling. A Republican Congress forces bicycling advocates to improve their message, it empowers Republicans who bicycle to take a […]

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If nothing else, the current round of federal transportation legislating should end the myth that highways are a uniquely self-sufficient form of infrastructure paid for by “user fees,” a.k.a. gas taxes and tolls. With all the general tax revenue that goes toward roads in America, car infrastructure has benefited from hefty subsidies for many years. […]

House GOP Won’t Let Transit-Oriented Development Get Federal TIFIA Loans

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House Republicans introduced a six-year transportation bill this week, and while it’s not the utter disaster that past GOP proposals have been, advocates for smarter federal transportation policy are playing defense. Today, the House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee marked up the new bill. About 150 amendments were introduced, according to Transportation for America. All but a few […]