Thursday’s Headlines from All Over

  • The backup driver in an autonomous Uber that killed a woman crossing the street in Arizona has been charged with negligent homicide (New York Times). But is that enough? The driver’s employer, the automaker and the designer of the road all share the blame (Streetsblog USA).
  • Transportation for America is organizing a tweetstorm today urging Congress to provide $32 billion in emergency funding for transit agencies. Tweet at your federal representatives — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is @senatemajldr) using the hashtag #SaveTransit.
  • With a key surface transportation bill set to expire at the end of the month, Congress can’t agree on an extension or a replacement. (Transport Topics)
  • Joe Biden has a detailed infrastructure plan, and President Trump does not. (Logistics Management)
  • Uber and Lyft are in it for the long haul when it comes to fighting against drivers’ labor rights. (Jacobin)
  • Dozens of cities turned streets into pedestrian malls to revitalize downtowns in the 1960s and ’70s. Most failed, but the ones that survived have a few things in common: high population density, low median age and short lengths. (Fast Company)
  • Smart Cities Dive interviews a Harvard professor about his new best-practices guidelines for micromobility pilot projects.
  • Maryland transit officials promised they’ll finish the Purple Line despite a dispute with contractors. (WTOP)
  • Bay Area Rapid Transit received its largest-ever grant, $1.2 billion from the Federal Transit Administration, to expand service and prepare for riders to return once the pandemic ends. (Streetsblog California)
  • The Texas DOT is considering turning a Houston toll road into an elevated highway with bus-only and carpool lanes. (Chronicle)
  • The world’s longest underwater road and rail tunnel will connect Germany and Denmark. (Arch Daily)
  • A Vancouver city council member wants to get rid of parking minimums for new development. (CBC)

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National Complete Streets Bill Back in Play

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There’s a new Complete Streets Act pending in both chambers of Congress, and it needs co-sponsors. The bill would require federally-funded road projects to meet the needs of pedestrians, cyclists, and transit riders — not just drivers. To ask your representatives to sign on as co-sponsors, head over to Transportation for America’s e-campaign. Sacramento representative […]

The Perils of Cul-de-Sac Development

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Loads of good stuff today on the Streetsblog Network. Portland Transport has a post on the connection between cul-de-sac development and safety for all street users, as discussed at the Congress for the New Urbanism Transportation Summit in Portland. What are the dangers of cul-de-sac development? (Photo: TheMuuj via Flickr.) For me the highlight presentation […]

Congress to America: “Get a Car!”

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Photographer and blogger Jay Mallin, whose video of Woodbridge, VA police ticketing injured pedestrians was picked up by Streetsblog NYC a year ago, has turned his attention to the congressional transportation debacle. Mallin’s new video is entitled “Get a Car,” and is named for the apparent message of the House transportation bill, and, to a lesser […]

Complete Streets Planning Becomes Law in Hawaii

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In more and more communities around the country, the benefits of complete streets — designed for the benefit and safety of all users, not just automobiles — are becoming clear. The latest advance comes in Hawaii, where the governor has signed legislation that makes building complete streets a state policy. Today on the Streetsblog Network, […]

US DOT Secretary Gets a Message on Pedestrian Safety

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We’ve got a fine sampling of content from the Streetsblog Network today. First, Steve Davis at Transportation for America reports on the meeting T4A and several of its partners had with US DOT Secretary Ray LaHood on Monday. The meeting was to deliver a petition with more than 4,100 signatures gathered after last week’s release […]