Tuesday’s Headlines

  • Former transportation secretary Ray LaHood predicts that Congress will move forward on a bipartisan transit funding bill (Axios). And just in time for the D.C. Metro, which is losing $2 million a day and considering serious cuts just a week after restoring nearly full service (Washington Post).
  • The survival of private bus companies that carry 10 million children to school is threatened by the pandemic, which has many students learning from home. They’ve been left out of federal relief packages and are asking for $10 billion in emergency aid. (New York Times)
  • Uber says it will be more transparent about safety information on self-driving cars after the National Transportation Safety Board partially blamed the company for a 2018 crash in Tempe that killed a woman crossing the street. (Bloomberg Law)
  • People are nervous about autonomous vehicles but are willing to give them a try. (Mobility Lab)
  • Despite the various and sundry “infrastructure weeks,” President Trump’s promise to invest $1 trillion never came to fruition. (NBC News)
  • Delays on the Gateway tunnel project underneath the Hudson River have raised the cost by $275 million. (New Jersey Herald)
  • The lack of gridlock on San Diego freeways despite more people getting back in their cars shows that, in normal times, putting just 10 percent of drivers on public transit could extend road capacity for 100 years. (Pacific)
  • A new transportation authority in central Virginia will build bus rapid transit and pedestrian and bike infrastructure, and also, unfortunately, widen roads using new sources of tax revenue. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)
  • A Cleveland city council proposal would replace its existing Complete Streets ordinance with one with more teeth. (News 5)
  • Sacramento will reveal plans Wednesday for a new multimodal transit hub downtown. (KCRA)
  • Kansas City will stop putting people in jail for unpaid parking tickets. (KTVO)
  • Everything’s bigger in Texas, including the freeway interchanges. One in Houston is the same size as Siena, Italy, which has a population of 30,000 residents (Texas Monthly). The article also has some interesting info about how the Cold War influenced sprawl.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

In New Orleans, LaHood Unveils $280M in Streetcar and Bus Grants

|
During a visit to New Orleans, where city planners are seeking nearly $100 million in federal stimulus money for three new streetcar lines, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood today announced plans to award $280 million in grants for streetcar and bus networks. New Orleans is counting on bonds, backed by sales taxes, to finance new streetcar […]

LaHood Reaches Out to Transit Industry, Lamenting ‘Lousy Economy’

|
Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood sought to commiserate with the cash-strapped transit industry today, declaring the Obama administration an ally of local rail and bus agencies even as the "lousy economy" clouds prospects for passage of a new long-term federal transportation bill. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood (Photo: Getty Images) In an address to the American Public […]

LaHood Praises NYC But Shrugs at Transport Reform to Empower Cities

|
Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood praised the New York City area’s clean-transportation strategy today in a speech to the region’s metropolitan planning organization (MPO), promising a stronger focus on urban priorities even as he all but ruled out two reforms long sought by the nation’s cities. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood (Photo: Zimbio) LaHood’s speech to the […]

LaHood Vows to Avert Federal Transpo Bankruptcy and Pay For It

|
The Obama administration is working on a plan to fill the shortfall in the nation’s highway trust fund by August without adding to the federal deficit, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood told Congress today. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood (Photo: HillBuzz) The circumstances behind the trust fund’s financial troubles are well-known: a nationwide decline in driving coupled […]

White House Staying Quiet For Now on Transit’s Role in Climate Bill

|
Delivering his climate-change message to Congress yesterday, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood warned that fuel-efficiency advances secured by the Obama administration would not be enough to reduce emissions from transportation — not without encouraging Americans to drive less. Transportation Secretary LaHood said today he’ll weigh in later on climate-change money for transit. (Photo: HillBuzz) But when […]

LaHood: NYC’s Congestion Pricing Money Still There for the Taking

|
Speaking at an event in Midtown yesterday morning, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood let it be known that New York City can still claim hundreds of millions of dollars in federal transit funding — if local lawmakers implement congestion pricing. NY1 reports: The city was slated to receive about $350 million in federal transportation funds to […]