Friday’s Headlines

  • Sustainable transportation like walking, biking and taking transit is likely to overtake private car trips in the world’s largest cities within the next decade, according to a Mobility Futures study. (Reuters)
  • After more hearings on autonomous vehicles this week, Congress remains at an impasse over how to regulate them. (The Verge)
  • Sure, humans are crappy drivers, but computers aren’t infallible, either. (Jalopnik)
  • A judge sided with Los Angeles in the city’s fight to get Uber to turn over data on e-scooter and e-bike riders’ trips. For now, people can still rent the Jump devices, but if the company doesn’t release the data, its permit could be suspended after March 15. (L.A. Times)
  • The Uber app has a new feature allowing users to see train schedules. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • Baltimore area leaders are pushing the state to boost transit spending by $500 million a year — measures Gov. Larry Hogan opposes. (Maryland Matters)
  • Student ridership on Sacramento light rail and buses more than doubled in January over the previous year after the city started letting students ride for free. (Bee)
  • New research suggests that cyclists are safer when they share a lane with buses only, like Portland’s “rose lanes,” rather than sharing a lane with general traffic. Still, Portland bike advocates view the rose lanes as a temporary solution until protected bike lanes are built. (Bike Portland)
  • King County Metro is restarting bus service to a Seattle ferry terminal. (KOMO)
  • The head of Louisville’s transit agency has resigned amid allegations of sexual misconduct. (Courier-Journal)
  • A driver in Cedartown, Georgia hit a man on a bike. Instead of calling 911, he called his friend the state representative, who called the police chief at home. It took them an hour to notice the cyclist dying in a ditch. (AJC)
  • The U.K. is moving ahead with high-speed rail connecting London with cities in northern England (BBC). Meanwhile, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced a billion pounds for safe walking and biking routes — not the 350 million he initially said in a “car crash of an announcement” — but bike advocates say that’s not nearly enough (Guardian).
  • Toronto transit riders are impersonating Vince Carter by dunking all over TTC’s new fare evasion ads. (BlogTO)