Thursday’s Headlines

  • The D.C.-to-Boston corridor, Seattle and Portland are the easiest places to live car-free, while going without a car is hardest in most of the Southeast and Midwest, according to a formula created by urban planner Richard Florida. (City Lab)
  • Apocalyptic environmentalist James Howard Kunstler talks to Strong Towns about how green energy, alternative fuels and other technologies won’t save the American way of life. Cities will get smaller, and suburbia and interstate highways will have to become things of the past.
  • Impeachment proceedings might finally bring an end to the White House’s incessant “infrastructure weeks.” (Roll Call)
  • Forget building bike lanes — just slow the traffic. (Price Tags)
  • A tentative list of upcoming metro Atlanta transit projects includes rail to the suburbs of Norcross and Clayton County, Emory University, and along the entire 22-mile Beltline, as well as bus rapid transit in DeKalb, Fulton and Gwinnett counties. But regional transit officials acknowledge the list requires billions of dollars in federal grants and may be a bit ambitious. (AJC)
  • Transit opponents in Houston have formed a PAC to fight an upcoming $3.5-million bond referendum (Chronicle). No word on where its funding is coming from — could it be the Kochs?
  • Washington state and Oregon have agreed to a deal on a new bridge over the Columbia River after Washington agreed to incorporate “high capacity transit.” (Oregonian)
  • The Michigan legislature cut $10 million in funding for transit agencies to replace aging buses from the budget it sent to Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. But it puts an extra $400 million into roads and bridges. (Free Press)
  • Arlington residents want more buses and bike lanes serving Amazon’s car-centric second headquarters. (ARLnow)
  • The Cincinnati school board is urging the city government to adopt Vision Zero. (City Beat)
  • President Trump thinks cars should be heavier and use more gas. Add cars to the long list of things Trump knows nothing about. (Jalopnik)