Wednesday’s Headlines

  • Several automakers are investing in e-bikes and e-scooters, betting that they — not cars — are the future of urban transportation. (Business Insider)
  • Infrastructure is expensive in the U.S., but that’s not necessarily a bad thing, because if it were cheaper, governments would build more and wider roads. (Strong Towns)
  • Light rail opponents’ claims about Phoenix’s South Central extension are misleading, according to an Arizona Republic fact check.
  • Cleveland has chosen four vendors — Bird, Lime, Spin and Veloride — to bring e-bikes and dockless scooters back to the city after banning them last year. (Plain Dealer)
  • Boston is considering taxing Uber and Lyft rides to drive users toward transit, but some ride-hailers say that won’t get them to change their routines. (Globe)
  • An Atlanta architectural firm says the new $33-million pedestrian bridge over Northside Drive is the poster child for cities wasting money on flashy projects rather than basic infrastructure. (Curbed)
  • Montgomery County, Maryland, is building what planners there say is the East Coast’s first protected intersection. (WAMU)
  • Governing profiles Pennsylvania’s new transportation secretary, Leslie Richards, who is trying to make community engagement a priority. Ah, Governing, we’ll miss you when you’re gone.
  • Philadelphia cyclists are pushing for a protected bike lane on Delaware Avenue. (KYWN)
  • Growing Boise needs better transit, and those Potato State officials are looking to Portland and Salt Lake City as examples. (KTVB)
  • Your hate-read for the day: Colorado pundit Mike Rosen says he doesn’t hate cyclists — but he sure doesn’t want to do anything to keep drivers from killing them, either (The Gazette). Allow a Denver Post columnist to retort.
  • In the latest example of #FirstWorldProblems, Twitter is mad that the font on some new D.C. Metro station pylons is wrong. Metro says the contractor will fix the error, so rest easy, Helvetica Bold fans! (WAMU)

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