Friday’s Headlines

  • After years of flat growth, New York’s Citi Bike system — already the largest in the country — will triple in size and cover twice as much of the Big Apple, thanks to a $100-million investment by Lyft. (StreetsblogNYC)
  • Cities like Cincinnati are realizing that — news flash! — minimum parking requirements actually stymie growth and economic development in urban areas, because space wasted on parking could be put to better use. (Governing)
  • Electric cars can’t save us from climate change. Extreme weather will make power outages more frequent and electricity more expensive. Public transportation, biking and walking need to be in the mix as well. (Mobility Lab)
  • A Boston redevelopment project shows how cities might repurpose underutilized parking garages. Unfortunately, not all of them are blessed with iconic 1920s architecture. (Forbes)
  • The Twin Cities have a won a $74-million federal grant for bus rapid transit between Minneapolis and Burnsville, 17 miles away. (Pioneer Press)
  • The Seattle suburb of King County currently devotes nearly a quarter of its $11.7 billion budget to transit, but officials want even more revenue sources for better bus and train service. (Crosscut)
  • Opponents of a light-rail line in Phoenix are petitioning to put it back on the ballot again, even though voters in the Valley of the Sun already approved it once. (Arizona Republic)
  • A report from a Washington, D.C-area business group says Baltimore transit should be run locally, not by the state, and needs more funding, among other recommendations. (Sun)
  • Greater Greater Washington has a vision for bus lanes on 14th Street.
  • KSAT explains San Antonio’s Complete Streets program.
  • Houston planner Christof Spieler’s new book “Trains, Buses, People: An Opinionated Atlas of U.S. Transit” lives up to its name, calling Boston’s Silver Line “ungainly” and Detroit’s transit system “a comedy.” (City Lab)
  • Glenn Scott

    I wouldn’t call King County a suburban county as it does include Seattle proper.